NEWS: Mad Scientist Cage Match on Omnivoracious

Eight of the contributors to The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination championed a mad scientist each and made a case for why that person is the best mad scientist ever. But who is the victor? That’s up to you to decide! Best comment (at Omnivoracious) wins a free copy of the anthology. [link]

EVENT: 7PM Today at Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing in Beaverton, OR

Tor Books is sending editor John Joseph Adams on a short, regional/west coast book tour in support of the release of The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination. Today’s event is listed below, but you can also check out the whole tour schedule to see if he’s coming to a bookstore near you.

EVENT: 1:20 – 2:15 PM Today at Emerald City Comic Con in Seattle, WA

Tor Books is sending editor John Joseph Adams on a short, regional/west coast book tour in support of the release of The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination. Today’s event is listed below, but you can also check out the whole tour schedule to see if he’s coming to a bookstore near you.

  • Emerald City Comic Con
    • PANEL: The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination
    • Mar. 3, 1:20pm – 2:15pm
    • Hall C | Rooms 602-603
    • Washington State Convention Center, 800 Convention Pl, Seattle, WA
    • Also featuring contributors Daniel H. Wilson, Seanan McGuire, and Chris Claremont!

NEWS: Theodora Goss’s Story from Mad Scientist’s Guide Now Available on StarShipSofa

You can now listen to one of the stories from the anthology–Theodora Goss’s tale, “The Mad Scientist’s Daughter”–over on StarShipSofa. [link]

REVIEW: Locus Calls Mad Scientist’s Guide “[an] anthology to recommend.”

“[An] anthology to recommend. … It is perhaps the nature of such a book, featuring stories told from the point-of-view of mad scientists, to show a tropism towards snarky, not quite serious, but quite enjoyable tales of villains justifying themselves.”

Horton goes on to single out Heather Lindsley’s “The Angel of Death Has a Business Plan” as the best of the snarky, not quite serious stories, and also name-checks Diana Gabaldon’s “The Space Between” and Jeffrey Ford’s “The Pittsburgh Technology” as standout stories of a more serious bent.